Sarracenia literature and images


To view a portfolio of images from the Sarracenia purpurea population of Southern New Hampshire, please follow this link:

To view full-length papers for the following abstracts, please follow the links below:

1.  A study of a pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) population in a peatland of southern New Hampshire

Marc Sudman
New England College, Henniker, New Hampshire

Department of Biology
Independent research project
Jun/99

Abstract--A population of pitcher plants, Sarracenia purpurea, was investigated over a one month period beginning on 17 May/99. I marked a total of 83 colonies of S. purpurea and collected demographic data. A total of 134 plants were investigated and both inflorescence and new growth phenology were noted. At the end of the investigation, 15 Jun/99, new growth were still forming and several plants were still producing flowers. This paper will provide quantitative data concerning this previously uninvestigated population that will serve as a platform for future investigations. An addendum to this paper provides general and anecdotal observations made during this investigation. A portfolio of ca. 30 pictures documenting new growth forms/stages, inflorescence stages and development, and various other images accompany the text.

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2. Resource parasitism by spiders in response to morphological correlates of prey capture rates in pitchers of the carnivorous pitcher plant, Sarracenia purpurea (Sarraceniaceae)

Marc Sudman
New England College, Henniker, New Hampshire

Department of Biology
Independent research project
Jun/99

Abstract--A field-based investigation was conducted to infer whether or not spiders (Frontinella pyramitela) were cueing in on pitcher morphology when choosing foraging sites (web sites) in the pitchers of Sarracenia purpurea. This is a unique example of resource parasitism as these spiders are sheetweb weavers which predominantly weave webs in small shrubs, bushes, etc. I marked a cohort of 134 pitcher plants (colonies) which contained 234 actively trapping, 2nd year pitchers (649 total pitchers). These pitchers were monitored over a one month period for the presence of webs occluding the aperture of pitchers. After 3 weeks of sampling, only 7 pitchers were observed to be occluded by a web.

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3.  A Sarracenia purpurea population in a peatland of Southern New Hampshire

 

Marc Sudman
Marc Sudman
Journal of the International Carnivorous Plant Society
Volume 37, No. 1
March 2008

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